Mama Lola



Mama Lola Karen McCarthy Brown s classic book shatters stereotypes of Vodou by offering an intimate portrait of African based religion in everyday life She explores the importance of women s religious practices along with related themes of family and of social change Weaving several of her own voices analytic, descriptive, and personal with the voices of her subjects in alternate chapters of traditional ethnography and ethnographic fiction, Brown presents herself as a character in Mama Lola s world and allows the reader to evaluate her interactions there Startlingly original, Brown s work endures as an important experiment in ethnography as a social art form rooted in human relationships A new preface, epilogue, bibliography, and a collection of family photographs tell the story of the effect of the book s publication on Mama Lola s life. Best Download Mama Lola [ By ] Karen McCarthy Brown [ Kindle ePUB or eBook ] – therehabboutique.co.uk

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  • Paperback
  • 447 pages
  • Mama Lola
  • Karen McCarthy Brown
  • English
  • 06 August 2017
  • 0520224752

10 thoughts on “Mama Lola

  1. Bill says:

    Walking between the worldsKaren McCarthy Brown has penned a masterpiece Mama Lola, known to family and friends as Alourdes, is a Mambo, an initiated priestess of Voudou who earns a modest living by serving her immigrant countrymen in America as a traditional healer and by conducting Haitian Voudou rites in her Brooklyn home In 1978, Brown, then a professor of religion at New Jersey s Drew University first encountered Mama Lola while doing an ethnographic survey of the local Haitian population Walking between the worldsKaren McCarthy Brown has penned a masterpiece Mama Lola, known to family and friends as Alourdes, is a Mambo, an initiated priestess of Voudou who earns a modest living by serving her immigrant countrymen in America as a traditional healer and by conducting Haitian Voudou rites in her Brooklyn home In 1978, Brown, then a professor of religion at New Jersey s Drew University first encountered Mama Lola while doing an ethnographic survey of the local Haitian population Intrigued by the priestess and her misunderstood and maligned tradition, Brown became at first a friend, then a member of Mama Lola s extended family and finally an enthusiastic participant in many of the rites that comprise the corpus of Voudoun devotional life.Mama Lola, her daughter Maggie, their children and their ancestors, and the Lwa spirits who frequently possess them are an engaging, wonderfull...

  2. Pamela says:

    This is an extraordinary book Karen McCarthy Brown spent over a decade getting to know the Haiti born mambo or Vodou healer known in her Brooklyn community as Mama Lola In this account, she is part anthropologist and part friend Mama Lola comes off as an utterly real person temperamental, sometimes unkind, but a woman of great gifts and insight Her grown daughter too is coming up in the line of family mambos Brown also does a good job of conveying what life is like for Haitian emigre This is an extraordinary book Karen McCarthy Brown spent over a decade getting to know the Haiti born mambo or Vodou healer known in her Brooklyn community as Mama Lola In this account, she is part anthropologist and part friend Mama Lola comes off as an utterly real person temperamental, sometimes unkind, but a woman of great gifts and insight Her grown daughter too is coming up in the line of family mambos Brown also does a good job of conveying what life is like for Haitian emigres still half connected to the country of their birth or their parents birth and half absorbed into American society The Vodou religion is widely misrepresented and misunderstood outside of Haiti and even inside it , and this book, with its mix of anecdote, history, folk tale, travel narrative, and accounts of actual Vodou rituals the author underwent her own initiation but does not describe that here, as the details of that...

  3. Juliana says:

    This is a really fascinating look at Vodou Brown talks about it largely from the perspective of the people she grew to know in the course of writing the book, and from her own perspective as she became involved with the religion herself, rather than as an outsider looking at a little understood and much misunderstood religion I d recommend it to anyone who wants to learnabout Vodou, and to people who want to knowabout Haiti, since while the focus is on Haitian immigrants in Brook This is a really fascinating look at Vodou Brown talks about it largely from the perspective of the people she grew to know in the course of writing the book, and from her own perspective as she became involved with the religion herself, rather than as an outsider looking at a little understood and much misunderstood religion I d recommend it to anyone who wants to learnabout Vodou, and to people who want to knowabout Haiti, since whil...

  4. Rebecca says:

    This is a book hard to rate Some parts of it is quite interesting on the modern read 1980s use of vodou in Haiti and how it transforms and translates to life for Haitian immigrants in New York That really IS quite interesting The presentation of Alourdes Mama Lola is okay though I might found it a bit too personal, in a way that the book doesn t really warrant But what really made me want to hurl the book to the other side of the room from time to time is Karen s personal involvement This is a book hard to rate Some parts of it is quite interesting on the modern read 1980s use of vodou in Haiti and how it transforms and translates to life for Haitian immigrants in New York That really IS q...

  5. Alex says:

    This is probably the first and easily the best ethnographic study done of Haitian vodou to date Brown writes carefully about her subject and notes, as anyone who tries to look at vodou purely from an academic standpoint will tell you, that the only way to really understand what vodou is and does is to go inside and join the religion, which Brown did.As someone who found vodou before he found Mama Lola, the book reverberates as a taste of home the practices detailed are familiar and the lwa wri This is probably the first and easily the best ethnographic study done of Haitian vodou to date Brown writes carefully about her subject and notes, as anyone who tries to look at vodou purely from an academic standpoint will tell you, that the only way to really understand what vodou is and does is to go inside and join the religion, which Brown did.As someone who found vodou befo...

  6. Bey Deckard says:

    Finally got my copy back and it s returned to its shelf in my library This is one of those books I m forever lending out because I absolutely loved it and I thinkpeople should read it I first read it in an anthropology class that dealt with magic, religion, and spirituality and it stuck with me.

  7. Christina says:

    Packs in a lot of textbook information, without sounding like one Personal, touching, andtangible than any other anthropological piece I ve read.

  8. Rebecca says:

    This book was wonderful I didn t know much about Hatian Voodou and this was a great intro It was also a much faster and less dry read than many academic texts.

  9. Robyn says:

    granted I read this almost 4 years ago preface this review with a heavy As I recall My blas attitude toward this book has very little to do with the content It is, in fact, a very fast and pleasant read certainly worthy at least of a plane ride summer peruse Alourdes Mama Lola tale is an important one and certainly words like inspirational, admirable and touching are not undeserved At the risk of sounding a tad ornery, I suppose my issue with the book stems from granted I rea...

  10. Jena says:

    I didn t know anything about Haitian Vodou prior to reading this book other than common stereotypes from popular culture A friend of mine is pursuing her doctorate in religion and mentioned this book during a Bible study session By Bible study, I refer to a group of people from my church who meet once a week to discuss all sorts of spiritual questions, issues, disciplines, etc whether or not they derive from a Christian perspective Mama Lola fascinated me Karen McCarthy Brown weaves I didn t know anything about Haitian Vodou prior to reading this book other than common stereotypes from popular culture A friend of mine is pursuing her doctorate in religion and mentioned this book during a Bible study session By Bible study, I refer to a group of people from my church who meet once a week to discuss all sorts of spiritual questions, issues, disciplines, etc whether or not they derive from a Christian perspective Mama Lola fascinated me Karen McCarthy Brown weaves together stories of Haitian family lore with current Vodou practices Through her stories, you gain a sense of how this group of Haitian immigrants have brought their healing traditions to their lives in New York The book is very dense full of detailed stories of the various Vodou spirits often a blend of African spirits and Roman Catholic saints More than anything though, it dispelled misinformation I had about voodoo culture and shed light on a spiritual culture that strives to heal, understand, and connect in ...

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